Draw on December 2 at 4 p.m

1396Remaining tickets

Live better for the beneficiaries who benefit from every gesture made by the TSF teams.
Live better for you too by participating in our annual draw which could earn you:

$100 000  in cash

Journey of discovery for 2 people in Bolivia or Tanzania (Value of $15,000 or $10,000 in cash)

At 7, little Dayana rediscovers life

Welcome to Bolivia, community of Laja.

Read her story

LIVING TSF is finding a path.

Little Dayana has come a long way since being diagnosed with ataxic cerebral palsy. In fact, she has made so much progress that she may soon be able to play outside with the other children. 

When everything changed

At the age of three, Dayana developed a high fever. Despite the prescription of syrups, she ends up having convulsions which leave her in a deplorable state: she loses the use of her legs and is unable to speak. Panicked, her parents take her to the children’s hospital in La Paz but obtain no further diagnosis. Her father is dumbfounded, “They took her temperature and that was all they did!” It is thanks to a private doctor they learn that Dayana’s brain is damaged. According to her mother, the absence of the pentavalent vaccine (diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, influenza type B and hepatitis B) could be the cause of the disease.

Searching for solutions

Dayana’s parents, who come from the indigenous Aymara community, go to great lengths to find treatment for their daughter, but in vain. “We spent all our money and even sold many of our things to find out what was wrong with her.” Finally, a doctor advises them to take the child, now 6 years old, to physiotherapy. But the center is too far away and there is not enough money or time to follow up. 

Securing treatment!

It felt like a never-ending battle, but thanks to the physiotherapy clinic set up by TSF, Dayana was finally admitted for treatment in January 2021. Her sessions with Dr Karina considerably improved her condition. The young girl developed strength in her limbs and is now able to hold objects in her hands, open doors, stand up straight and walk on her own.

“Sometimes I’m almost afraid for Dayana, because since she has started walking, she wants to go out and play all the time!”

Great progress!

Thanks to the care she receives, Dayana is showing much progress and her parents are hopeful that a new path is opening for her, one which will allow her condition to improve and allow Dayana to lead a more fulfilling and joyful life.

Close

Naweji, refugee, twice blessed by fate.

Welcome to Republic of the Congo, in Brazzaville.

Read his story

LIVING TSF is about Imagining the future.

For Naweji BAMUBILA and her husband, the future is that of their twins, born after their four siblings, and today safe and sound thanks to the quality of care of Terre Sans Frontières.

The harsh reality of being a refugee

Although they were leading a quiet life in Kinshasa, Naweji and her family had to take refuge in Brazzaville because of her husband’s political activism. “In terms of food rations, I managed with my husband and the local helpers. We were able to feed our children. But what if one of us got sick?” That is when Naweji learned that she was dealing with a multiple pregnancy.

“When you are a refugee in a foreign country, the biggest problem is money. “

Maintaining dignity despite adversity

Naweji is a fighter. With no resources, she heads for the Plateau Health Center where she is taken care of free of charge for all her prenatal consultations. She remembers the kindness of Dr. Grace Mabiala, a TSF employee, who greeted her “with dignity”, and emphasized the kindness of the midwives. She explains: “The attention and the quality of care have always impressed me. Everyone was very professional.”

Unexpected complications

Due to her worsening condition, Naweji was transferred to the Blanche Gomez Mother-Child Hospital for delivery. At birth, the low weight of the babies worried the doctors, but despite their advice, the mother prefered to go back home. “I prayed to God to take care of my children,” she says. After eight weeks, one of the twins required emergency hospitalization. TSF then provided nutritional assistance and medication, in addition to paying for biomedical analysis and hospital costs.

“All these services were rendered with a big smile and great generosity. “

Safe and sound!

The happy mother stresses that TSF’s support saved the life of her sons. She concludes: “The sympathy of the nursing staff and the financial support we received will remain etched in my heart forever.” She can now imagine the future for her family.

The child of the slums wants to give back.

Welcome to Haiti

Read his story

Living TSF is about moving forward.

Moving forward in life is what Joshua has been doing since he was one of the very first children admitted to the Maison de l’Avenir Jacqueline-Lessard (MAJL), a childhood development center opened in 2012. 

From a disadvantaged family

Josué Jean Louis was born in 2002 in Jemau, a town in Cité Soleil, in Port-au-Prince, a neighbourhood sadly known for its widespread banditry. The fourth of eight children, Josué was cared for by members of his extended family for several years until he entered, at the age of 10, the MAJL in Croix-des-bouquets, whose mission is to provide quality education to disadvantaged children.

 Dedicated to his academic success

Calm, respectful, responsible, eager to learn and to help his comrades, Joshua demonstrates his abilities during primary school, and continues to distinguish himself in high school. With other young people, he participates in an extracurricular program during which he comes in contact with many activities: from capoeira, folklore dance, drum lessons and reading workshop, to cooking and craft lessons, acrobatics, and even global citizenship workshops. The goal is for Joshua to become a youngster who is open to the world, educated and autonomous. Throughout his learning, he keeps in touch with his parents who never fail to encourage him, proud of his successes.

“I hope Joshua becomes a great man in society. "

Ambassador from the Heart

Now 19 years old, Josué left MAJL 1 year ago to join TSF’s sponsorship, excellence, and leadership program in Vialet, where he continues his education while also leading activities offered to youngsters. He was given everything he needs to become a responsible citizen, an example to follow, someone who has an impact on his community, in which he has already established links and made friendships. In fact, he was the one who welcomed five new youths to the program.

“Be open to the learning opportunities available to you. It is for your good and it will benefit you “.

Giving back

Immersed in his dreams of becoming a computer engineer, Josué continues to Want to move forward for himself, but also for others. Indeed, the young man wishes to complete his classical studies and enter university, all the while continuing to work with his TSF sponsor for the advancement of the children of the orphanage.

 

Close

Where female entrepreneurship pays off.

Welcome to Mali, village of Doubabougou

Read her story

Augustin, age 19, and his journey as a displaced person.

Welcome to Democratic Republic of the Congo (DROC)

Read his story

Living TSF is about hope.

Hope for a better future for Augustin, a young adult, who has managed to support his two younger brothers since the disappearance of their parents during armed conflicts. 

A terrifying night

He remembers the night his family fled the Codeco militia attack like it was yesterday. “My father told us to sleep with two changes of clothing on. Around midnight, he woke us up because the village was emptying to the sound of militia drums beating in the mountains. When we left the house, bullets whistled all over the place. Everyone fled into the forest. Two of my younger brothers followed me, but I don’t know where my parents and the two youngest ended up. ” 

Getting back on track with CAAP 

After the disappearance of his parents, Augustin and his younger brothers spent a year living under difficult conditions on a site for displaced persons. They survived thanks to odd jobs and food distributed by NGOs — mostly peas and corn. Having become the head of the household despite his limitations, no training and only a Grade 6 education, Augustin felt unhappy and helpless in the face of the future. “And then the CAAP (TSF Professional Support Learning Center) gave new meaning to my existence,” he confided. Today, he earns his living as a renewable energy electrician. He has a circle of friends and is happy that his income can enable his brothers to study. 

“I feel fulfilled and have confidence in the future. ” 

Life goes on 

Augustin is very grateful for the training offered by TSF, as well as the tools provided so he could start his new profession. Now he can regain hope for himself and his family. But reuniting with his parents still remains his biggest dream …